pandora-australia

My WordPress Blog

Are Eyelash-Enhancing Medicines Safe to Use?

During the past year, a steady stream of women (and a few men) have visited my office practice asking about the drug Latisse, a product that darkens, lengthens, and thickens eyelashes, and whether it is safe to use. Before I discuss specific information about this medicine, it is important to understand what the term safe to use actually means.

The safety of medications is determined and overseen in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Actually, several other countries throughout the world also rely on the FDA’s stringent standards for drug safety. Before a drug can be approved for public use by the FDA, it must first successfully pass through a sequence of clinical trials to establish its efficacy, effectiveness, and safety. If a drug meets this standard, it either will be approved for general use (over-the-counter) or restricted use (doctor’s prescription required). A drug typically is placed under restricted use if it is potentially dangerous if used incorrectly, if it carries the possibility for misuse, if its side effects can be potentially severe, or if more data needs to be collected about the spectrum and intensity of its side effects.

Latisse falls into the restricted category, meaning that it only can be used under a doctor’s supervision. The FDA has deemed this drug to be safe if used as directed, with the caveat that a person may experience side effects that can be mild to severe. However, this endorsement is based upon a statistical analysis of data gathered from clinical trials and cannot be applied directly to individual cases. Thus, the critical question is if this product is safe for YOU. In truth, medical science cannot give you this guarantee, as each of us has a unique metabolic profile that is based upon genetics, physiology, lifestyle, and life circumstances. For this reason, it is important to monitor how you are reacting to a medicine and report any side effects that you experience to your physician, regardless of how trivial they might seem to you at the time. Danh gia Titan Gel

Now that we understand how the safety of medicines is determined, let us address the product Latisse specifically.

On December 5, 2008 the pharmaceutical company Allergan, Inc. received approval from the FDA to market Bimatoprost ophthalmic solution under the trade name Latisse. Since its approval, use of Latisse to enhance eyelash prominence has become a highly popular cosmetic trend.

It is interesting to point out that although the Allergan website promotes Latisse as a treatment for eyelash hypotrichosis (inadequate or insufficient quantity of eyelashes), the actual FDA approval only is for cosmetic purposes. Recently, the FDA gave a formal warning to Allergan, indicating that advertising for the product did not adequately disclose its potential side effects. I will clear up any confusion about its side effects here.

Originally sold under the trade name Lumigan by Allergan in North America and Europe, Bimatoprost ophthalmic solution is a prostaglandin analog that received FDA approval for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension (elevated pressure inside the eye). However, ophthalmologists prescribing this medication noticed that it appeared to be promoting the growth of longer, fuller, and darker eyelashes in their patients. This prompted Allergan to investigate Bimatoprost as a potential cosmetic preparation.

Since its introduction, more than one million prescriptions of Latisse have been filled. Interestingly, other prostaglandin analogs, such as Latanoprost (Xalatan) – manufactured by Pfizer – and Travoprost (Travatan) – manufactured by Alcon – have similar effects. Thus, other prescription lash-enhancing products likely will be emerging on the market soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *